Lavender Profile

Posted by Jonathan and Kaycie Cook on

Lavender Essential Oil Profile

Latin name: Lavandula Angustifolia  formerly known as Lavender Oficinalis, also known as Lavandula pyrenaica or Lavandula vera

     The names all refer to the exact same plant. The plant has been known by all of the above throughout history but the official Latin name has become Lavandula Angustifolia.

History: Lavender was traditionally used to “comfort the stomach.” Also as a cosmetic water. It has been used to scent linen. A very versatile oil.

 

Common Uses today: Lavender is used as a tea, especially with chamomile before bed to aid in sleep. May also be used in the form of the oil as a massage to promote relaxation and sleep. Used to soothe skin irritation such as insect bites.

Constituents: Lavender is made up of over 100 constituents, many of which are soothing to the nervous system. The most prevalent constituents are linalyl acetate, terpineol, cineol, limonene, ocimene caryophyllene.

Actions:

                Analgesic: Pain relieving without loss of consciousness.

                Anticonvulsive

                Antidepressant

                Antimicrobial

                Antirheumatic

                Antiseptic

                Antispasmodic

                Antitoxic

                Carminative: releases gas from the stomach

                Cholagogue: promotes flow of bile

                Choleretic: promotes bile secretion

                Cicatrizing: promotes wound healing

                Cordial: revives, invigorates

                Deodorant

                Diuretic

                Emmenagogue: promotes menstruation

                Hypotensive

                Insecticide

                Parasiticide

                Sedative

                Stimulant

                Sudorific: encourages sweating

                Tonic

                Vermifuge: kills parasitic worms

                Vulnerary: used for healing wounds

Purchase some high quality Hungarian Lavender from mirapur.com 

Note: Although herbs and essential oils  perform many actions similar to that of pharmaceuticals, they are not tested as pharmaceuticals to for strength or efficiency to treat specific diseases. Herbs are properly used as a part of a healthy, natural life, but do not replace the advice of a skilled physician.

Essential oils are very concentrated and should be used appropriately. Do not use any essential oil ‘neat’ (undiluted, one or two drops, directly on skin) until you are confident of your own response to the oil.

 © 2019 Kaycie and Jonathan Cook 

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